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Syllabus

Winter 2015 Syllabus for ICS -010.-63Z
ICS -010.-63Z - Tamika Brown
Introduction to African American Studies
Call Number: 1293
Term: Winter 2010
4 units
De Anza College Distance Learning Center • LC 107 • Phone: 408-864-8969 • FAX: 408-864-8245 • http://www.deanza.edu/distance/
Prerequisites
None
Instructor Information: Tamika Brown
My research interests include: African American 20th & 21st History and the social stratification of disempowered ethnic and minority groups in the U.S.

Phone: 408 219-6244
Email: browntamika@fhda.edu
Office Location: TBA
Office Hours: Thursdays 1pm -7pm via cell phone and by appointment
Requirements
Class Participation: All students are expected to engage in respectful and considerate debate in the on-line discussions. The environment will stimulate you to think for yourself, challenge paradigms and raise critical
questions. We will maintain a healthy environment by not insulting your peers and/or using abusive or harsh language.
Objectives
1. Understand the historical and present day relevance of African American Studies
2. Analyze the historical relationship between Africans and Western Europeans and its effects on the African American experience
3. Gain an in-depth understanding of the African American experience.
4. Define key concepts such as racism, prejudice, race, discrimination, culture, class, and explain how such concepts function within the African
American community.
5. To develop the ability to think, speak and write intelligently and critically about the field of African American Studies and the black American experience.
Course Description:
This course examines the historical processes leading to the development of African American studies. We will explore the African American experience, particularly as it relates to the historical relationship between Western Europeans and slavery, segregation, the civil rights movement, the Black family and a board range of issues relevant to the understanding of the African American experience. Through critical readings, class discussions, and films, students will have opportunities to develop an understanding of institutional discrimination, race, and class issues situated within the context of African American life.
Textbook
Required:Darlene Clark Hine, William C. Hine, Stanley Harrold. The African American Odyssey. Combined Volume. Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006
Make Me Wanna Holler, Nathan McCall, 1994 (ISBN 0679740708)
Media Availability
Computer with high-speed Internet access.
Written Assignments
Required Assignments:
On-line Chat Discussions: Students will be required to respond to questions related to the readings and/or lectures posted by the Professor every two weeks. Each student must post a response to the questions and provide feedback to at least one student's posted response.
Research paper ONE: Students are required to write a paper on a prominent figure in African American Culture and Political Thought. You may choose ONE of the following individuals: Nat Turner, Frederick Douglass, Marcus Garvey, WEB DuBois, Ida B. Wells, Paul Robeson, Malcolm X, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Cornel West, Richard Wright, William Julius Wilson, Medger Evers, Zora Neale Hurston, Alex Haley, Thurgood Marshall, Bell Hooks, Sojourner Truth, Carter G. Woodson, Mary McLeod Berthune, Constance Baker Motley, Booker T. Washington, Fannie Lou Hamer, Phillis Wheatley, Shirley Chishom, Stokley Carmichael, Louis Farrakhan, Spike Lee, Russell Simmons.
Research paper TWO: Students are required to write a research paper on a topic relevant to African American Studies. You may select ONE topic from the following list:
  • The Black Press (1865-1945)
  • Race Riots (1865-1945)
  • Black Wall Street (Oklahoma)
  • First African Americans in Major League Sports
  • The Tuskegee Experiment
  • The Tuskegee Airmen
  • Black Historical Colleges and Universities
  • Lynching in the Antebellum South 1865 to 1950s
  • Famous Black Inventors (1865-1945) at least 5 individuals
  • The Underground Railroad
  • The Black Panthers
  • The Nation of Islam
  • HIV/AIDS in the Black community
  • Domestic Violence in the Black community
  • Poverty in the Black community
  • The Harlem Renaissance
    Each paper must be typed, double-spaced, and font size 12. You must provide at least 2 references in MLA format. Each paper should be at least 5 pages and no more than 7 pages in length. Grammar and spelling count!
    PBS on-line streaming video "The House We Live In": For this entire assignment all papers must be at least 4 or more pages, typed, and double spaced.
    After viewing the film please respond to the following questions and send via e-mail to the professor:
  • Who was allowed to become a naturalized citizen before 1954 and who wasn't? What rights and privileges do citizens have that non-citizens don't have? What were the consequences for those denied citizenship?
  • How did European "ethnics" become white? What changes made this possible?
  • How did federal housing policies institutionalize segregation and wealth disparities?
  • Why do property values go down when a neighborhood changes from whites to nonwhite? Who plays a role in this?
  • What happens to measures of racial disparities in places like education and welfare rates when groups of similar income AND wealth are compared?
  • Exam Notes
    Examinations: Quizzes will be based on chapter readings. The final exam will include questions from book readings, text book readings, and film (PBS on-line streaming video).
    Final Grade
    You may access your final grade through the Star System (408-777-9394 or 650-917-0509), and the Internet(http://regserv.fhda.edu/da-grades.html).
    Testing / Grading
    Examinations: Quizzes will be based on chapter readings. The final exam will include questions from book readings, text book readings, and film (PBS on-line streaming video).
    Late Assignments: Late homework and exams will not be accepted. Please complete the exams and on-line discussion assignments by the due dates listed in the syllabus.
    Grading
    Course Evaluation:
    On line participation 20%
    Research Paper one 10%
    Quizzes 15%
    Final Exam (N. McCall) 25%
    PBS film reflection questions 10%
    Research Paper two 20%
    A large portion of your grade is based on your on-line class participation. The class participation grade will be calculated based on your regular involvement in the on-line class discussions. You are responsible for completing assigned readings each week so that you can fully participate.
    Grades
    Grading Policy:
    100-90 percent A
    89-80 percent B
    79-70 percent C
    69-60 percent D
    Under 60 percent F
    Assignments Schedule
    Week 1
  • Introduction to Course
  • Student introductions
  • Guidelines for papers
    Week 2
  • Race in America
  • Racial Ethnic Identity Development for Black Americas
  • The Middle Passage
    Ch. 2 Optional practice quiz on Chapter 2
    Week 3
  • Black People in Colonial North America
  • Rising Expectations Ch 3, 4
    Quiz # 1 Chapters 3, 4
    Week 4
  • Life in the Cotton Kingdom
  • Free Black People in Antebellum America Ch 6,7 Respond to on-line chat question: Did racism promote the enslavement of Africans or was racism used to justify slavery? Please explain your response in detail.
    Week 5
  • Liberation
  • The Meaning of Freedom Ch 11, 12
    Research paper # one due by Friday at 9pm
    Week 6
  • The Meaning of Freedom
  • White Supremacy Triumphant Ch 13, 14
    Quiz # 2 Chapters 13, 14
    Week 7
  • Black Southerners Challenge
  • Conciliation, Agitation, and Migration
  • View the PBS streaming video Ch. 15 &16
    Week 8
  • African Americans and the 1920s
  • Meaning Freedom
    (Suggested timeline for reading McCall)
    Makes Me Wanna Holler,
    Nathan McCall Ch 17, 19
    Ch 1 to 11 Respond to on-line chat question: TBA
    Week 9
  • The Freedom Movement
  • The Struggle Continues
    (Suggested timeline for reading)
    Makes Me Wanna Holler,
    Nathan McCall
    Ch 12 to 23
    Quiz # 3 Chapters 21, 22 Hine, Hine & Harrold
    Week 10
  • Black Politics, White Backlash
  • African Americans at the Dawn of a New Millennium
    (Suggested timeline for reading)
    Makes Me Wanna Holler, Nathan McCall
    Ch 23 to 34
    Respond to on-line chat discussion questions: Nathan McCall's Book
    Week 11
    Makes Me Wanna Holler, Nathan McCall Ch 34 -44 Research paper two due by Friday at 9pm
    Week 12
    Final Exam Ch 1-44 Nathan McCall's Book
  • Cheating
    Policy on Copying and Cheating:Students who submit the work of others as their own or cheat on exams or other assignments will receive a failing grade in the course and will be reported to college authorities.
    Catalyst Information
    This course utilizes Catalyst, De Anza's Online Learning Community. Please view the Catalyst website at https://catalyst.deanza.edu/ to login. Please note that you will be unable to login until the first day of class. Be sure you are using your correct username and password - do not use your social security number or international "99" number. If you need help logging in or finding your student ID, please view the short instructional video at: https://catalyst.deanza.edu/?pg=mod1. Additional instructions and assistance can be found on the Catalyst website.
    De Anza College Bookstore Contact Information
    Phone: 408-864-8455
    http://books.deanza.edu/
    Videostream Information
    This course utilizes streaming video which can be accessed via the Catalyst system. Please view the Catalyst website at https://catalyst.deanza.edu/ to login. Please note that you will be unable to login until the first day of class. Be sure you are using your correct username and password - do not use your social security number or international "99" number. If you need help logging in or finding your student ID, please view the short instructional video at: https://catalyst.deanza.edu/?pg=mod1. Additional instructions and assistance can be found on the Catalyst website.

    Due to licensing restrictions video programs are not available for downloading.


    Distance Learning
    Building: MLC 250
    Email: distance@deanza.edu
    Phone: 408.864.8969
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    Last Updated: 9/5/13