Sunken Garden Fountain

Instructional Planning & Budget Team

Christina Espinosa-Pieb  Chair

Coleen Lee-Wheat  Co-Chair


Present: 

Administrative Reps: Anderson, Espinosa-Pieb, Muthyala-Kandula, Schroeder, Tomaneng
Classified Reps
: Englen, Knittel, Qian
Faculty Reps: Lee-Wheat, Mitchell, Roberts, Singh, Stockwell
Student Reps: Kenneth Perng
Students Visitors:
Christine Yu (DASB Senator), Arvind Ravichandran (DASB President)

Absent: Bryant

Visitors: Booye, Caballero De Cordero, Castillo, Chow, Chung, Cook, Glapion, Hansen, Haynes, Jeanpierre, Haynes, LeBleu Burns, Lee, Lee-Klawender, Leonard, Lomanque, Mieso, Milonas, Moberg, Newell, Thai, Woodward

I. Welcome: Students Reps Kenneth Perg, Christine Yu (DASB Senator) and Arvind Ravichandran (DASB President) were introduced and welcomed.

II. SSPBT “core student” overview: Castillo, Mieso and Moberg presented SSPBT Core Students power point. SSPBT members - Castillo, Mieso, Moberg reviewed the SSPBT Core Student Project 2011-12. Newell assisted in gathering data for the project from Banner. They raised these questions: How can we serve fewer students with fewer dollars? Who they are and how many of them? Castillo and Moberg were focused on those students who have difficulties staying in college. They pointed out targeted populations, basic skills, low-income students, and high school grads. Castillo and Moberg identified the main goal is to use as many components as they could to serve to those students.

Three student core groups were identified using different criteria for each. Each group was evaluated to determine if Matriculation mandates could be met with reduced resources. The goal is to give core students the best chance to succeed. Pathways to completion include redesigning policies and tools to successfully move students through.

The power point will be posted on the SSPBT and IPBT websites.

III. Small group discussions questions: What would be the possible impact of these reductions upon the college and its ability to serve students:

Lee-Wheat distributed the course reduction handouts and asked members to review and give a feedback and summated.

From your perspective, how will these proposals impact the college and its ability to serve students?

IV. Small group share insights with larger group 5 – 8 min per group plus discussion:

International Students

 

 

What has the most impact?

Less ISP students taking assessment placement tests or less math sections for ISP students to be tested for?

Loss of income to the college, $10 million if   international student program was dispanded

ISP should become a self-sustaining enterprise like the bookstore or dining services. It’s the only program that can control what it charges its students—is this possible?

Less ISP students may equal less need for math classes

IS program key to our future.

Can DASB assist with ISP?

Will less math offerings result in ISP students choosing to go to another institution?

ISP is regulated by the government.   Fines imposed if not compliant.

International students lend to the culture of the college

Don’t have enough people to serve them as it is.   Program has doubled from 800 to 1700 in last decade.

Are international students taking courses away from targeted populations? Do international students fit into targeted student groups?

Counseling for ISP has not seen a proportional increase, but ISP student transfer rates are still high

Counseling

 

 

Has the impact of counselors currently being on leave been studied? How could this information inform the prospect of losing 5 counselors?

5 counselor reduction would result in dramatic reduction in holistic counseling services-and would relegate trained counselors to information and academic advising services only

If a counselor were to decrease meetings to 2 hours per week and don’t teach courses wouldn’t this allow an increase of advising time per counselor?

How can more time be made for counselors to work with students?

How will “degree works” fill some of the loss of counselors? –Still will need a counselor to sign the ED. plan to make them official.

Counselors should not count meeting time in their paid hours. No other faculty have compensation for committee meetings.

Negotiations? How is it that counselors only have to work 30 hours a week when other faculty have to work more? Why are counselors capped at 10 hours max doing meeting/professional contributions when other faculty are not?

Is there a plan for restructuring counseling to provide the most services to the highest number of students at the lowest cost?   Other colleges are   changing, have they been studied?

Ratio of student to counselors, 1700 to one--amazing

We may lose our ISP program if we lose counselors.

Financial Aid

Loss of work-study funding and loss of financial aid for our lowest income students=a disproportionate impact on low income students

Limiting access

BHES

Decreasing program/service quality

Delay of students ability to enter workforce in a timely manner

 

Worst case scenario: Federal Funding MOE requirements would not allow for the “sspbt proposal” without a stiff fine .

 

Creative Arts

 

 

 

Why such deep and disproportionate cuts to Creative Arts?

Large cuts to small programs will lead to the end of these programs.

Assessment Center

Admissions and Records

 

 

Technical expertise for A&R and assessment, counseling and articulation to stay in compliance with ALL new regs. From Fed. and State gov. agencies—NO CROSS OVER in this knowledge

What sort of delay will we see with the loss of 1 classified staff in the assessment center—days,   weeks?

Can DASB help with defraying cuts?

If DASB does help then they will have less funds to help in other areas.

Increased delay in serving students needs relative to application and transfer. Long lines also may lend to students giving up and going elsewhere.

Increased student frustration less people to help meet their needs.

A person must input scores into banner common assessment will not change workload.

 

 

 

Academic Services

Slowing of administrative processes

No direct impact on students but inevitably will affect the effectiveness of support for processes such as scheduling, curriculum, staff development, DARE

 

 

 

Physical Education

Minimal impact

Part-timers lose jobs

EOPS

Heavy impact on core students and low impact

Less of “community college”, overall minimal effect on students,   students “ecopass”

PSME

Chem and Math reductions affect large numbers of students—esp. international and transfer students

Can reductions in physics help to moderate effects of reductions in chem. And calculus

Language Arts

 

 

Apportionment losses are substantial

ESL 5 and ESL 6 should be reduced with increase in EWRIT1A AND EWRIT1B

Decrease more creative writing, suspend Technical Writing

Loss of ESL course offerings may affect ISP enrollment depending on levels reduced.  

If less ISP students occur would CA students fill seats?

How could the revenue of 10% fewer internationals students be recouped?

Reduce higher level EWRIT courses not 1A and 1B, preserve them

Shouldn’t ESL reductions occur in the higher level courses not in the lower levels?

 

Outreach and Relations proposal

 

                                     

Overall student enrollment will be at risk which may also put our college at risk for (not attaining our CAP) permanently losing $7 million in apportionment.

Could have a harmful impact on our equity goals and enrollment of underrepresented students, part of the “core” student population as identified by SSPBT.

 

 

 

Learning Resources

 

 

Will LR be cut further due to the lack of its ability to provide students with academic advising?

Will the new Student Success Center be able to operate as planned?

“No, this reduction represents an end to the model that the center was founded on”—G.Anderson

Financial Aid

Loss of work-study funding and loss of financial aid for our lowest income students=a disproportionate impact on low income students

Limiting access

BHES

Decreasing program/service quality

Delay of students ability to enter workforce in a timely manner

 

Worst case scenario: Federal Funding MOE requirements would not allow for the “sspbt proposal” without a stiff monetary penalty.

 

Creative Arts

Why such deep and disproportionate cuts to Creative Arts?

Large cuts to small programs will lead to the end of these programs.

 

 

 

General Statements

 

 

???? seems ludicrous

IPBT is working to maintain courses for core students

SSPBT reducing support services for core students

Looking to the future, I see increased frustration, anger and possible violence as a result of all of this (students and staff)

What kind of collaborative efforts can be incorporated that would support the creation of more “learning cohorts”?

 



 

GOVERNANCE - IPBT
Building: Administration
Contact: Olga Evert
Phone: 408.864.8940

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Last Updated: 11/30/11