MOMENTUM

The MOMENTUM series is a talk continuum and the Dean’s platform to engage the division in profound practice of mindfulness and actionable conversation – to bridge the equity gap, protect inclusivity, amplify social justice reform and intentionally address structural racism in our classrooms, college and the community.

MOMENTUM: A LECTURE SERIESThe purpose is to strengthen each other’s optimism, emotional control, empathy, perspective talk, prosocial goals and mindful attention.

It is a space to discuss and mobilize how we can better help our college’s work on policing equity and ending racism once and for all.


Spring 2021

Commitment to Fairness, Equity and Justice for All

NEW DAY AND TIME Thursday, April 22: 5:30–7 p.m.

Tom IzuGuest: Tom Izu, Representative, ACLU of Northern California

Moderator: Elvin T. Ramos, Dean, Social Sciences and Humanities

This event is open to all faculty, students, staff and community members.

  • Zoom ID: 982 5396 2923
  • Password: 078528

The ACLU of Northern California has been a guardian of civil liberties in our state since our founding in 1934. Over its 87-year existence, it has continued to adapt to new challenges – expanding its issue areas and strategies while keeping its commitment to fairness, equity and justice for all people. 

While best known for litigation, especially through its affiliation with the national ACLU, a key part of the work of ACLU of Northern California is actually based on the activism of volunteers who investigate and organize around local issues, such as protecting voting rights, fighting for racial justice, monitoring the use of surveillance technology, and many more. These volunteers compose its 18 local chapters throughout Northern California and the Central Valley.

Tom Izu, emeritus executive director of the California History Center and a volunteer with the Santa Clara Valley chapter of the ACLU of Northern California for the past seven years, will discuss the chapter’s activities, why he became involved in its work, and how the campus community can connect with the ACLU of Northern California and the Santa Clara Valley chapter.


Young People in Government

– Making Change Despite Imposter Syndrome

Wednesday, April 28: 3–4:30 p.m.

Ryan MiddletonGuest: Ryan Middleton, Special Assistant to the Chief of Staff, Prince George's County, Maryland

Moderators: Derrick Felton, Instructor, Psychology, and Elvin T. Ramos, Dean, Social Sciences and Humanities

This event is open to all faculty, students, staff and community members.

  • Zoom ID: 979 2485 7714
  • Password: 580613

Millennials and Generation Z make up the nation's emerging leadership class. In the years to come, these two generations will have to navigate implementing their unique perspectives on issues spanning the war on drugs, police reform, climate change, health care, income inequality and diversity. Bearing the burden of student loan debt while also entering a workforce still dominated by previous generations, Millennials and Gen-Z are in the precarious position of balancing advocacy for their issues while also advancing their own careers. Our guest speaker will discuss his transition from post-secondary education to starting his career in government and finding his footing to facilitate positive change.


Exploring Cultural Humility

Wednesday, May 26: 9–10:30 a.m.

Maleea JohnsonGuest: Maleea D. Johnson, Director of Equity and Inclusion, Carlow University

Moderators: Lori Clinchard, Instructor, Humanities, and Elvin T. Ramos, Dean, Social Sciences and Humanities

This event is open to all faculty, students, staff and community members.

  • Zoom ID: 938 7260 5936
  • Password: 670110

What is cultural humility and how do we engage with students, colleagues, community members and those with different world views other than ourselves? Understanding the importance of developing a self-awareness of one’s own culture, background and experiences as well as appreciating various cultures can support being able to engage with a cultural humility spirit. We will discuss what cultural humility is by definition and sharing of experiences, participate in an individual activity that prompts each person to reflect on their own culture and how their lens influences their interactions with others, and conclude by reflecting on how a culturally humble approach can support the work each of us are doing.


Igniting Fire in Our Youth to Transform Systems

Wednesday, June 2: Noon–1:30 p.m.

Cassandra WilliamsGuest: Cassandra Williams, Clinical Assistant Professor of Africana Studies, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Moderators: Steve Nava, Instructor, Sociology, and Elvin T. Ramos, Dean, Social Sciences and Humanities

This event is open to all faculty, students, staff and community members.

  • Zoom ID: 981 5665 6298
  • Password: 609429

The world is changing and transformational breakthroughs can come from many places: students, faculty, staff, administrators and our community. Once we start to leverage these learning environments and listen, we allow people to have a voice. Our current systems struggle to keep up with the world, so what are we waiting for? Now is the time to identify barriers and work together to create powerful systems that change with the times.


Black Deaf History: How Scholarship Became Personal

Monday, June 21: 10–11:30 a.m.

Sandra Jowers-BarberGuest: Sandra Jowers-Barber, Director of Humanities, University of the District of Columbia Community College

Moderator: Elvin T. Ramos, Dean, Social Sciences and Humanities

This event is open to all faculty, students, staff and community members.

  • Zoom ID: 922 6822 5063
  • Password: 049942

This conversation will explore how Dr. Jowers-Barber began researching Black deaf history and the importance of connecting deaf and hearing scholars of color. She entered graduate school at Howard University for a master's and doctorate in History, three months after her wedding. Her husband brought four wonderful children to the marriage. One was a student at Kendall School, Gallaudet University's elementary school for deaf students. Dr. Jowers looked through one of her African American history books and in ASL (American Sign Language) asked: "Where are the Black deaf people?" That question became the focus of her research and she will share that journey with De Anza community during this session.


Previous Events in the Series

  • SPRING 2021

  • WINTER 2021

  • FALL 2020

  • SUMMER 2020

  • SPRING 2020

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